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Brief therapy fun? You might doubt it.But I think it is. Before you run away with the idea that I’m being flippant or dismissive of peoples’ suffering, let me explain (in fact, I wrote a whole article to explain).

Therapy, brief or otherwise, is an important and serious business; nobody, client or therapist, should enter into it lightly. But that doesn’t mean that it has to be all about doom and gloom. Even with the most serious of life’s problems there are moments of lightness, times when the problem doesn’t dominate and yes, even laughter. That’s why I say that therapy can be fun while at the sem time respecting the dignity of the client, and the solemnity of the occasion.

Interest in Brief Therapy, SFBT in particular, has grown significantly in recent years. This is partly driven by economic and other constraints – doing more with less – but it should not be seen as a corner-cutting version of long-term therapy.

There are many reasons for this growth in popularity – which seems to be a worldwide trend – one of them is that therapy can be fun!

Though interest is growing there is still a vast amount of confusion among therapists and clients alike as to what the term ‘Brief Therapy’ means, and this article tackles that. As well as describing the reasons why brief therapists have more fun, it also tackles the serious question of these misunderstandings.

Clearing up these misunderstanding should be part of the job of all therapists, not just those of us who use brief approaches. The world populations are in sore need of accessible and effective mental health systems, and many people don’t get the help they need. This is made worse when help is available in the form of therapy, but people won’t look for it because of common misconceptions.

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6 Reasons Why Brief Therapists Have More Fun

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6 Reasons Brief Therapists Have More Fun

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