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This experiential workshop provides a sound framework for managers responsible for staff. This module has been specially designed help them understand and recognise the dynamics of bullying, and the types of behaviour which can easily be misinterpreted. The day also equips managers with ideas on improving communications in order to avoid appearing ‘heavy handed’ when instructing and supervising staff, particularly where deadlines are concerned. It also covers the statutory obligations towards staff, how to protect them and the interests of the organisation.

Contents

  • Introduction and expectations
  • The key management skills
  • Legal and Health and Safety duties
  • Balancing the interests of all concerned
  • Bullying and harassment: definitions
  • Whose responsibility is it?
  • Case studies from the law
  • Bullying: occupational risk factors
  • Bullying checklist, how staff perceive it
  • The manager’s dilemma: support staff and get results
  • Effective communication
  • Workload and deadlines
  • Staff supervision and guidance
  • Suitable responses to ‘cries for help’
  • Three strategies for reducing false accusations
  • Conflict resolution or mediation, when to get help
  • Protecting the staff and the organisation
  • Further resources.

Objectives

Improve their awareness of bullying issues

Recognise signs in themselves and others

Understand the Health and Safety and legal implications

Develop strategies for using the manager’s role responsively

Acquire practical information and advice on bullying and harassment

Know when and how to intervene if bullying is reported

Feel more confident in discussing the topic with staff.

Contact me to enquire about this training.

 

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