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Consultancy in a broad term to cover a range of services. In my case it refers to my activities designed to help organisations and groups function better in some way. My activities include, for example:

  • Helping teams resolve conflict and function more productively
  • Advising organisations in the ‘people’ and ‘relationship’ aspects of change management to ensure maximum buy-in and minimum disruption
  • Developing policy and guidelines on specific initiatives like bullying awareness, resiliency programmes, stress management or redundancy
  • Briefing managers and staff on working in culturally diverse settings
  • Assisting multi-disciplinary teams in developing effective communications and cohesive performance
  • Anticipating and minimising ‘people problems’ associated with changed working patterns
  • Team building and strengthening creativity and problem-solving
  • Information gathering through surveys, focus groups and interviews.

Working with a Consultant means drawing on the wider understanding, experience and skills of a specialist who is used to dealing with a particular set of circumstances. Situations that are outside the daily business norms can then be met with confidence and assurance – allowing managers to plan rather than experiment – thus saving time, reducing cost and increasing effectiveness. As I specialise in workplace relationships my expertise is in an area that is often overlooked by orgaisations which are accustomed to dealing with systems and structures and expecting their people to adapt and follow.

Must be able to:

  • Quickly tune in to the culture of the organisation
  • Be sensitive to organisational politics
  • Help define and clearly state measurable goals associated with the brief
  • Form a clear action plan
  • Involve. motivate and mobilise the relevant people in the organisation
  • Monitor and report on progress
  • Remove themselves as soon as they are no longer needed.
 

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