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There was a vogue in Universities a few years ago for offering courses of study in bizarre and crowd-pulling topics that were judged to be shallow and populist, rather than serious and academic. They attracted lots of criticism, if I remember correctly. I’m not sure if they attracted a lot of students.

There’s been a parallel debate going on that education doesn’t prepare people for work, and employers regularly complain about this in surveys. It’s odd that, since I have so often been asked if studying a a particular topic will lead to a job (I was asked this about psychology just last week).

So on the one hand we have people studying to improve their employment prospects, and on the other, employers saying that it doesn’t do it well enough. Maybe the subjects we are told we should study are all wrong and it’s time for change.

I have thought for a long time that Harmony would be a worthy topic of study (I used to teach Conflict Resolution). My recommended curriculum now includes degree courses in topics like Acceptance, Kindness, and Self-love.

I wonder what the critics would say about that!

One Response to “A Degree In Kindness”

  1. Thank you for this. I’ve held this opinion for a long time now. This type of attitude and behaviour should really be learned at home, but so often it is not. As a former employer, and employee I think this is often times more important than a particular skill set.

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