Skip to Navigation

Learning how to accept yourself as you are can be a bit of a challenge, but it is a way to reduce stress and self doubt, and to improve your self-confidence.

Most of us aspire to be something we’re not, at least from time to time. There are entire industries out there ready to help, at a price. Some of them are so eager they’ll give us a helpful nudge with alarming messages about what awaits us if we don’t improve ourselves.

It can be difficult to ignore them. It takes strength of character and self-confidence to accept yourself, warts and all, without feeling the need to change something. Achieving a zen-like state of calm is not easy, and keeping it is harder (but you could always go on a course).

There’s a lot more mileage in being what you are. It uses less energy, is less prone to failure, less disappointing (once you get used to it), and it costs less. The big advantage that many people miss is that, when you recognise and celebrate who you are, others begin to recognise it too.

2 Responses to “How You Behave Is What You Are”

  1. I see lots of “ifs buts and maybes” in this post. Don’t feel like debating today so ’nuff said.

  2. Fair comment Linda, thank you. I’ll be happy to respond to some of the ‘ifs and buts’ if you feel like it any time.

What do you think? Share your thoughts...

Latest from the blog

Trust at work

In difficult economic times the relationship between employees and employers is often tested. Trust suffers and staff turnover increases. But it need not be so. Creating an ethical company is low cost and high-reward.

Continue reading

Open plan is closing people off

Open plan is meant to improve productivity and efficiency. Cost-obsessed employers seem oblivious to what people really think about working this way, and the damage to morale and productivity.

The research is showing that removing walls may take down some of the barriers, but it also increases some of the problems it is meant to fix.

Continue reading
%d bloggers like this: