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Caring for a dependent relative can be demanding, particularly when the carer also has a full-time job. In managing the day-to-day demands of the two roles and dealing with the necessary concerns of the health and wellbeing of the person being cared for, the carer’s own needs can be neglected.

In this context the term ‘dependent’ refers to anyone who relies on another for their needs, material and emotional. The UK Government says that three in five people in the will become carers at some point in their lives, and defines a carer as “Someone who looks after and supports a friend, relative or neighbour who could not manage without their help. This could be due to age, physical or mental illness or disability.”

The stress of caring for a dependent can be considerable, bringing with it a range of side-effects and emotions that can be difficult to deal with. Many carers are surprised to find themselves affected in this way, yet the right guidance and some preparation will help the carer remain more resilient, the better to fulfil the demands of their dual-role.

This talk covers the key points to consider, in order to remain on top of the game when caring for a dependent and managing work commitments.

Content

  • The demanding role of the carer
  • The ‘dual-role’ stress reaction
  • Emotional responses in carers
  • Typical responses to loss, separation and grief
  • Dealing with loneliness, guilt and anger
  • Prioritising and time management
  • Managing stress and emotion
  • Eating, drinking and sleeping
  • Listening to the ‘self’ as well as others
  • Guidelines for caring for the carer
  • Three ways to remain more resilient
  • Where to go for help

Objectives

Understand how to balance the carer’s competing demands

Review lifestyle habits that promote resilience

Anticipate and counter the stress of the caring role

Make the most of personal strengths and resources

Hear suggestions for maintaining positive communications.

If you’d like to book me to give this talk: Enquire

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