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The world of work is replete with good ideas that don’t er… work.

The costs of email outweigh the benefits;  Open plan office lower productivity and morale; Saving time by taking fewer breaks means getting less done, not more; Meetings slow down decision-making…

Innovation sounds great because if you don’t change with the times you stagnate, right? Besides, everyone wants to distinguish themselves with great ideas, whether it is to shine in the office or sell more office furniture. We all know the examples above resonate with us, yet we all buy into propaganda and go along with the dodgy thinking. If you really want to make the workplace more efficient, productive and healthier then check the research and dare to be different.

Somebody out there has already done what you are thinking of doing. Look at what works, do more of it, and check the research before introducing new ideas.

That way you’ll avoid writing yet another policy that can’t be followed, or costly and disruptive office re-organisation, and other such good ideas that don’t work.

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