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Next time you take a walk in the woods, try taking a leaf from the book of Japanese wisdom which says “Experience the beauties of nature, and in doing so learn about yourself.”

There is no ‘right way’ to go about this; simply immerse yourself in the experience of being where you are at that time. If that sounds too mysterious or vague to be a useful directive, here’s how:

As you walk focus your attention on specifics in what you see around you.

Give your full attention to some aspect of the environment you are in. For example you could choose to study the cloud formations, to notice the shapes of leaves, or to note the many different shades of green in a first of a landscape.

That’s all. Except to say, this works anywhere, so you don’t necessarily have to be walking, nor in a wood.

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