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If  you want to change a habit or some aspect of your behaviour, it is easier to move towards what you want than it is to move away from what you want to change. So, to become a vegetarian, for example, first decide that you are becoming one and then design an attractive vegetarian diet. This will work better than trying to ‘stop eating meat’.

No one likes to lose something (and that even goes for things we might think we want to lose!), so rather than trying to leave your carnivore diet behind, create an attractive vegetarian vision and move towards that.

This works very well for learning habits of thinking too. Would you like to be able to create an instant oasis of calm, so that you can step outside the hurly-burly of your daily demands? To be able to still your mind, to find momentary peace, even amid chaos, is an invaluable skill, so here’s how:

  • Find a natural object like a small stone, a leaf or a flower
  • Find a quiet spot (lock yourself in the toilet if you have to)
  • Sit comfortably and consciously register that you are creating a personal oasis
  • Study the natural object using all your senses. How does it feel, does it have a smell, examine the colours, does it make a sound? Depending on what it is you may not want to taste it.
  • Be very curious about it, how long has it existed, what sort of lifespan does it have, what is its relationship to its environment?
  • Become totally absorbed for five minutes.
  • When you have finished, carefully put the object away somewhere. You can come back to it another time or release it into the wild when you have finished with it.
  • Return to the hurly-burly, a new you, slightly above it all (more objective and connected with yourself, anyway}.

That’s all you’ll see that it is much easier to go somewhere (the oasis), than it is to leave somewhere (chaos). Rather than attempting to flee the chaos, create a moment of peace. Create calm and the noise subsides.

Special moments

This also is invaluable as a little ritual if you want to remember or honour someone or something. Perhaps on the enniversary of a loss, turning point or new beginning. Try it today.

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