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I usually ask attendees at my training events “Who has learned a new set of skill since leaving full-time education?” Maybe it was a hobby or pastime, like sailing or music, or a something in connection with their work. Most people have.

I then ask “How long did it take to become proficient?” Responses vary, anything from weeks to years to, “Not yet”.

The point of the question is that, however good the content and the presentation, nobody really expects to leave the training room after a few hours fully able to put into practice what they have learned.

Learning new things takes practice, so any workshop, class , or course of coaching or therapy, is only ever a starting point. It has to be backed up with regular practice and application, and that takes commitment.

This is just as true for skills mainly involving the mind – like thinking and managing our emotions – as it is for physical ones requiring use of the body.

Personal change and transformation requires commitment to act consistently and persistently, but it’s OK to take small steps, say, one a day for each day of the year.

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