Skip to Navigation

Throughout my life I’ve notice that,¬†whenever I have been in crisis I have turned to making or doing something where I could see a tangible result. It might have been home decoration, chopping firewood or building something, but it always involved toil and product.

Making things is good for the soul. (If ‘soul’ is a turn-off for you and you want something more tangible, how about ‘sense of self’ or ‘identity’?)

Work is increasingly about using the mind and activities that don’t engage us physically. When we do do manual work it is often automated and with little of what can be called craftsmanship (this is a gender-neutral expression to convey a set of skills or talent for making things). There’s skill involved in both, but it’s hard to derive personal pride or any real sense of achievement from sitting in an office or standing in a shop.

While there’s no doubting the sense of achievement of closing a sale (been there), or completing a written project (done that), or crunching a pile of numbers into meaningful information (and that too), work that involves the body as well as the mind is more fulfilling and satisfying.

I don’t mean to devalue number-crunching, writing or providing important services. They are all important, but they are not enough. We’ve evolved to forge a path through life and in so doing shape our¬†identity through the tangible and visible results of our efforts.

At one time, ‘work’ meant we’d be able to see the results of our efforts. With luck, we’d also have derived benefit from the care, attention and skill we’d employed.

When in doubt, make something. It’s great therapy.

4 Responses to “Making Things Shapes… All Sorts of Things”

  1. I agree 100%. Sometimes it is an effort to make myself “do” something creative but always feel better afterwards. Feeling really down today about the direction most of our “leaders” are taking us in. Hypocritical on all counts and short-sighted verging on blindness. Think I’ll go bake a cake.

  2. Yes, thank you for this. It is good to ‘get out of your head’ to put it simply. I will find myself de-cluttering or cleaning which is physical and seems to de-clutter my mind as well; but on most occasions when I am in a bad spot I grab my camera gear and go for a drive by the ocean or in search of something interesting.

  3. Thanks for your comment Catherine. There was a time in my life when photography saved my sanity as well.

    De-cluttering can be a great way to clear the mind, and I’ve often recommended it as a therapeutic task to clients. I haven’t thought about it in a while, and I feel a post coming on… thanks again.

What do you think? Share your thoughts...

Latest from the blog

One thing better

Getting things done is not half as satisfying as doing things well. This is because we get personal satisfaction from giving something all our attention, doing it to the best of our abilities, being absorbed in it while we are doing it, and looking back with pride at a job well done.
“Enough time” has nothing to do with it, as you’ll see.

Continue reading

Trust at work

In difficult economic times the relationship between employees and employers is often tested. Trust suffers and staff turnover increases. But it need not be so. Creating an ethical company is low cost and high-reward.

Continue reading
%d bloggers like this: