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It is sad that many people are threatened by the idea of seeing a therapist. This is partly the fault of therapists themselves, who do nothing to counter the popular misconceptions and stereotypes about therapy.

So it is that people are left with ideas that someone who seeks therapy:

  • Is crazy, weak or incapable
  • Is unable to manage their own life
  • Will be analysed, judged and/or criticised
  • Will have to make weekly visits for months
  • Will have to discuss their feelings and private thoughts.

I’ve been a therapist for many years and my experience is that people who I see as clients are:

  • Clear and capable people who want help solving a problem
  • In need of a solution with some troublesome aspect of their life
  • Happy to have one or two conversations about how they can get their life on track
  • Able to do something for themselves with a little guidance.
People shy away from getting help with their emotional balance or mental wellbeing, yet the same people will visit the doctor for a physical problem, or a lawyer with a legal one.This ‘tragedy of ignorance’ as I call it, means that many people continue to struggle, and limit their opportunities, because of a few misconceptions.

One Response to “Misunderstandings that Limit Opportunity”

  1. My own personal thoughts on this subject is that if you don’t have good mental health you’ll never have good physical health. Heal your heart, then heal your body. That’s what works for me anyway!

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