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Yet again I have heard a story about a young man starting out who, while struggling to adapt to a new life at  university, was prescribed medication to help with his ‘problems’. It helped, but the downside is that this young man now believes that an acceptable response to the challenge of bigger problems means upping the dose.

Despite the apparent glamour of student life the real story, at least at first, is one of  schoolchildren adapting to early adulthood. It involves separation from home, new friendships (or not), exams, deadlines and oh… welcome to the real world where money occasionally runs out.

Pathologising life’s problems does nothing to help normal development, and it can be the first step on a career most people wouldn’t choose, one that involves repeat prescriptions and lowered self belief.

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