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Fed up with a daily diet provided by the mainstream media? While it is useful to keep abreast of things, the modern 24-hour news machine means that – like it or not – we are all subjected to a daily bombardment of news we probably don’t want or need. After all, if it’s important, with constant news coverage of everything we’ll probably find out anyway whether we are avid news-watchers or not.

Then there is the question of our mental well-being. For almost 100 years psychologists have been saying that we should protect ourselves from unremitting negativity, catastrophising and the constant worry of bad news. That which we focus on becomes our reality, so too much content filled with negativity and disaster does our heads in, as they say.

So limit your intake of bad stuff, and wherever possible contrast every negative story with at least two positive ones. This will provide balance and give your inner world-view editor something to work with.

I recently found a useful resource for doing this. Positive News has been going for over 10 years now. It is available as online and print versions, and on top of that it is a stimulating and at times inspirational read. Check it out at the link below.

Find out more: Positive News

What do you think? Share your thoughts...

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Listening is not for the faint-heated, but the benefits are worth the effort.

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I’m Wrong About Most Things, At Some Point

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Nothing wrong with that, but it is best to recognise it, and to keep an open mind about what will happen next. The greater our need to keep things the way they are, the greater the risk of disappointment and even neurosis.

Trying to control the uncontrollable is unpleasant for us, and those around us.

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