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This talk offers an opportunity to consider the personal issues as you prepare your retirement. It will help you anticipate and prepare for your future by thinking through some of the key aspects of personal change, and it will providing ideas on how to avoid the common pitfalls as you prepare yourself for a fulfilling retirement.

Retirement can be a daunting prospect for many people. It can sometimes be difficult to envisage how to adjust from the regular routines and the demands of working life to enjoying a more leisurely and fulfilling time. Our increased longevity means that retirement may last 25 years or more, so a little preparation is advisable.

There is much emphasis on the financial aspects of retirement. Little is said about the impact of the change on one’s identity and emotions. Successful transition involves a psychological shift which many people are unprepared for.

Content

  • Defining retirement, what it means to you
  • Transitions as opportunity
  • Predictable aspects of change
  • Personal expectations about retirement
  • Identifying  personal resources and skills
  • Your post-retirement role
  • Five key stages in planning
  • Managing the change in relationships
  • Predictable lifetime events
  • Setting priorities in retirement
  • Sources of information and help.

Outcome

This 60-minute talk provides a space to think about the transition from active working life to active life after retirement. It will draw attention to some of the emotional changes that can occur, and give suggestions for managing the change constructively.

If you’d like to book me to give this talk: Enquire

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