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A one-day workshop for managers and staff

Solution Focused Conflict Resolution (SFCR) provides a refreshing and effective way or moving out of the apparent complexity of conflict, to a collaborative and highly effective process of creating mutually acceptable goals and solutions.

SFCR provides a structure for handling conflict. Whether we are in direct disagreement with others, negotiating, or intervening as a family therapist, mediator, social worker – or any other role that requires to work with conflict – this workshop will radically alter the way you think about disputes and disagreement, and help you identify the strengths and resources needed for more fruitful outcomes.

As well as providing clear models and explanations for a better understanding of the causes and dynamics of conflict, it will help you identify the strengths and resources needed by the disputants for them to transcend the ‘conflict mindset’ and achieve more fruitful outcomes.

Above all, Solution Focused Conflict Resolution will provide you with tactics and strategies that will enable you to intervene confidently and effectively in order to resolve conflict.

Conflict and disagreement are often aggravated by the thinking styles used in our attempts to solve them. Interpersonal clashes, different agendas and failure to ‘buy into’ organisational or group objectives, can all be creatively handled using SFCR. By consciously adopting a Solution Focused way of thinking you can break deadlock and move the relationship forward.

Solution Focused Conflict Resolution is an approach developed by Barry Winbolt. This two-day workshop provides a thorough understanding of the principles and application of SFCR, and on day two the opportunity to put it into practice using examples from casework. It is primarily intended for people who use conflict resolution in their work. As part of the course prior reading for delegates who are not already familiar with Solution Focused thinking is provided in advance.

Course content

  • Terminology, aims and expectations.
  • Solution Focused thinking, a brief overview and a description of SFCR
  • Useful theories of conflict  and resolution
  • Cognitive, emotional and behavioural components in conflict
  • The five common factors in every conflict
  • Three clear strategies when working to resolve conflict
  • Why problems are not ‘facts’ but outcomes
  • Typical patterns that lead to deadlock
  • How to break the conflict spiral and prevent escalation
  • Creating new possibilities, the nine essential steps
  • Goals and aspirations; where you are and where you want to go
  • Destinations vs. journeys; remaining vigilant
  • Changing what we can, acknowledging what we can’t
  • Skills strengths and exceptions; overlooked resources
  • Dialogue versus discussion; how to know when you are making a difference
  • Building a collaborative working relationship
  • Anticipating and measuring progress
  • Follow-up and maintenance procedures.

Course objectives

Learning how to remain resourceful in the face of conflict

Find out how to create opportunities when impasse looms

Quickly recognise the limiting patterns in any conflict

Identify resources and opportunities rather than ‘problems’

Learn to develop and structure achievable goals

Help those who are ‘stuck’ develop a viable working relationship

Become more resourceful in mediation, advocacy etc.

Learn to apply the approach in a variety of settings.

The workshop is suitable for:

Family Therapists, Counsellors, Psychotherapists of all persuasions
Social workers, Carers, support workers
Advocates, Mentors, Coaches
Teaching Staff, particularly those involved in pastoral care
Mediators and Conflict Resolution practitioners
Mental Health Practitioners
Members of the Helping Professions who encounter conflict in their work.

Book this workshop for your staff

 

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