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Have you noticed how the mismatch between words and the actions?

We shout Happy New Year from the rooftops, yet privately look back with regret, and forward with pessimism.

Of course it is natural to regret what is lost or missed out on, and negativity, used well, can be useful (see my post), but if you want to give yourself of really having a Happy New Year it helps to think differently.

Here are my Seven Points for a Happy New Year:

  1. As you look back over the past year, think about what went right for you
  2. Identify one high point in each month so you get a list of 12 high points
  3. Separately, find five things you have done in 2009 that you are proud of
  4. Ask a trusted friend or family member what they think you have achieved during the year
  5. Take time to review all this data and ask yourself what most gives you a sense of enjoyment and achievement
  6. Create new year’s resolutions around doing more of what makes you feel good
  7. Train your mind by setting aside time to think about how to create a Happy New Year, practice daily.

That which we focus on becomes our reality. You will probably find that your mind tends to review the bad stuff like what it sees as failures and shortcomings. Train it to think differently and you’ll start to feel different.

I know that 2009 has been tough on a lot of people. Some will continue to be depressed about it and with luck prove themselves right by continuing to think like that. Others will decide to do something different, change their mindset, and look forward with confidence to a genuinely Happy New Year.

By the way, you can use this at any time of the year to help with focus or motivation. When is New Year anyway? There are several options.

My Best Wishes for 2010, whenever it is for you.

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