Skip to Navigation

We are problem-solving creatures. We love a challenge and without them we don’t grow and mature fully. Perhaps it is also the case that if we are under-stimulated – if we are not using our intelligence and particularly our problem-solving abilities sufficiently – we suffer.

To take this a step further, I have often wondered that if we don’t use our wonderful intelligence (that should really be plural as there are many kinds), it will turn inward and create problems so we have something to occupy us.

If this is so, creative though the human mind is, the problems it creates tend to be disturbing and even disabling. It would be great if an under-used intellect could set its owner crosswords and Sudoku to keep itself busy, but it doesn’t. Mostly, it comes up with different variations on a theme of ‘something to worry about’.

This poses the question in an ever-simplified and institutionalised  world where increasingly we are not required to make, create or do things that challenge us, how will we fare in emotional and spiritual terms?

2 Responses to “We Are Natural Problem-Solvers, That’s the Problem”

  1. This reminds me of the quote (can’t remember source unfortunately) “if you’re not playing a big enough game you’ll screw up the one you’re playing, just to give yourself something to do.” I think this points to the same issue: we are problem-solving but also problem-generating creatures!

What do you think? Share your thoughts...

Latest from the blog

Never Mind What Others Think

what others think

Even though we don’t realise it when we say we know what someone thinks about something, we are guessing. Even mind-reading – in a fairground or on stage – is trickery.

Yet we often allow our own thoughts and behaviour to be goverened by what we claim someone else will think. Maybe it’s time to review what we ‘know’.

Continue reading

One thing better

Getting things done is not half as satisfying as doing things well. This is because we get personal satisfaction from giving something all our attention, doing it to the best of our abilities, being absorbed in it while we are doing it, and looking back with pride at a job well done.
“Enough time” has nothing to do with it, as you’ll see.

Continue reading

Trust at work

In difficult economic times the relationship between employees and employers is often tested. Trust suffers and staff turnover increases. But it need not be so. Creating an ethical company is low cost and high-reward.

Continue reading
%d bloggers like this: