Skip to Navigation

Questions are powerful, to be sure, and in all sorts of ways, some unexpected. You might think of them as a grammatical construct designed to elicit information, but they also tie us up in knots, so they can be a powerful waste of time.

Asking why something happened, or why someone did this or that, for example, might be a fun way to pass the time of day, but answers to questions like these can be hard to find. Even then, they may not help in a practical way.

Asking what needs to happen, how to respond, or who can help fix something might be more sensible; answers will provide direction and momentum and can tell you what to do next.

“Why?” is speculative and if it provides answers at all they will be uncertain. Whereas questions preceded by who, where, what, how or when are on firmer ground, and they tend to indicate a course of action.

Why?” may reveal a cause, so if you think you need to deal with the result of something (it’s effect), you’d best design your questions well and to understand – each time you ask one – what you hope it will do.

 

What do you think? Share your thoughts...

Latest from the blog

Why It’s Better to Believe What Makes You Comfortable Than What Is True

Comfort zone

Metaphorically, you might say, some people will stop to look in a mirror to see what they could learn, while others will hurry past it, in case they learn something.

Continue reading

Which Community Do You Belong To?

A community is held together by shared interest and respect for other members. In this sense of community, people rally round ideas and aspirations in the hope of carrying both forward. Yet most of us pay only lip-service to the values of the communities we belong to, doing little or nothing to help them flourish.

On the other hand, there are those who are able to bring some passion to the game. They explore what they think and feel about who they are, where they fit in the grand scheme of things, their purpose, and what it all means to them.

Continue reading

Thermometers and Thermostats

Which one are you? A thermometer measures the ambient temperature of its milieu. It checks and reports. A thermostat on the other hand responds to its environment. It also checks, but then it makes little adjustments… it actually influences the environment. You might say that a thermometer is a rather passive receptor, and a thermostat […]

Continue reading
FREE DOWNLOAD - Get it now.

How to be more Resilient

Get my super-helpful guide '9 Steps to Resilience' absolutely FREE, when you subscribe to my newsletter.

Understand the steps to resilience and you can develop the ability to cope with problems and setbacks with less stress and more confidence.
close-link
%d bloggers like this: