Skip to Navigation

When I’m talking about Brief Therapy I sometimes hear the comment:  “It’s just a sticking plaster”. The idea that therapy has to be long and drawn out to be effective is a myth, but it’s a tenacious one.

The is no link between duration of therapy and effectiveness; long or short all approaches have about the same rates of customer satisfaction, according to research. How long therapy should last is generally decided by the way the therapist has been trained (her of his preferred way of working), rather than clinical suitability.

Likewise, some clients want regular therapy sessions over an extended period, and some prefer just a few sessions.

I cut my finger recently and I covered the wound with a sticking plaster. Because it was an awkward cut, not deep but likely to be easily disturbed if I removed the plaster,  I left it covered for a few days. When I did take the plaster off – surprise, surprise – the wound had almost completely healed!

So what’s wrong with sticking plaster anyway?

What do you think? Share your thoughts...

Latest from the blog

One thing better

Getting things done is not half as satisfying as doing things well. This is because we get personal satisfaction from giving something all our attention, doing it to the best of our abilities, being absorbed in it while we are doing it, and looking back with pride at a job well done.
“Enough time” has nothing to do with it, as you’ll see.

Continue reading

Trust at work

In difficult economic times the relationship between employees and employers is often tested. Trust suffers and staff turnover increases. But it need not be so. Creating an ethical company is low cost and high-reward.

Continue reading
%d bloggers like this: