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We are exhorted to remember things, though remembering in itself is not admired, memory – demonstrating the ability to remember –  certainly is.

This extends to remembering a lot of stuff we have no need to remember, jut because remembering is seen as useful and admirable.  Of course some things are worthy and important, and should be remembered. Just as important is remembering some of the painful events as well, for various reasons. But indiscriminate remembering can be a curse.

We often forget (If we ever knew), that forgetting is just as important as remembering. There are many situations where it is highly desirable to forget something. They are too numerous to go into here.

Remembering to forget is an underused habit, and just as useful as remembering. In some circumstances it is not an inability to forget that foils us, but our unwillingness to do so.

3 Responses to “Please Remember to Forget”

  1. Remembering is often non-volitional e.g. trauma or just ‘bad memories’. Once surfaced, it’s good to be able to manage our memories – integrate rather than suppress. CBT might not tackle that but forms of psychoanalysis do.

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