Skip to Navigation

Is it possible that some people can lavish kindness and compassion on others, but they are unable to do the same for themselves?

A step further in this reasoning might be that some people show compassion for others because they are not unable to do it for themselves.

Compassion is not pity, nor self-interest. Compassion is the desire to bring help or relief when we are confronted by suffering or pain. While such benevolence is acceptable when directed at others, some people might think that doing it for oneself is not acceptable.

We benefit in all sorts of ways when we are compassionate. Genuine caring and doing things for others produces hormones associated with pleasure and bonding. It can make us more resilient to stress, more caring and, in short, better people.

But if all our efforts are directed outwards, while it might earn approval and even get us a gold star or two for being nice, to become a better person you also have to care for yourself. Consider self-compassion as a contributor to your own wellbeing.

See Also

Article and video What is Compassion.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Latest from the blog

What If Your Inner Voice Is Wrong?

The gift of insight is a wonderful thing. But how an you tell the difference between what is truly insight, and the ‘clutching at straws’ mindset in a moment of desparation?

Intuition my not be reliable, because It’s still the same person making the decisions, whatever they are guided by.

Continue reading

Choice is Empowering

Being ‘spoilt for choice’ is a nicer problem to have than feeling trapped by circumstance.

If you are unfortunate enough to find yourself in a situation you feel helpless to change, creating a range of options can be empowering, without having to actually do anything else.

Continue reading