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It’s the stock question we reel off at parties, and it tends to provoke a canned response.

How do you answer it? The thing is, stock question or not, in the moment we answer we defining ourselves in the mind of the other person.

It’s not just the words, non-verbal stuff matters too. Some say it is more important

An Example

Try saying “I’m a [your job/role title]” in two ways:

  1. With a downbeat, dull depressing tone of voice and ending on a downward note, while looking at the floor
  2. In an upbeat, bright and positive manner, ending on an upward note, while looking directly at the questioner

You get my point.

People can tell a lot about us by the way we introduce ourselves, and a lack-lustre response creates a dull impression.

The thing is, stock question or not, in the moment we answer we not just saying something ABOUT ourselves, we are saying something TO ourselves.

We hear everything we say, and our inner mind believes it. Even when you follow a negative statement about yourself with “I don’t mean it” or “Not really”, you mind thinks you do mean it.

So beware. If you want to get on in life update your canned response with something that truly represents who you are or what you aspire to be.

As I said before, your mind hears everything you say.

2 Responses to ““What Do You Do?””

  1. Great post! This has interested me for so long. Our subconscious minds hear everything we say and think. My book is about this exact same thing. It’s called “Your Subconscious Mind Is Listening.” I’d love to send you a free copy if you’re interested 🙂 let me know!

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